The Meno,
Part 2

The Difficulty

The Hypothesis

Virtue is Knowledge (if this is true, it can be taught)

The Challenge

If it is teachable, where are the teachers?

Enter Anytus

...he is the son of a wealthy and wise father, Anthemion, who acquired his wealth, not by accident or gift... but by his own skill and industry, and who is a well-conditioned, modest man... moreover, this son of his has received a good education, as the Athenian people certainly appear to think, for they choose him to fill the highest offices.

Socrates' Argument

Conclusion: There Are No Teachers of Virtue

  1. What's the Argument?

  2. Do you find it compelling?

Anytus' Reaction

I for one would warn you to be careful

Socrates:

... should the day come when he knows what "speaking ill" means, his anger will cease.

Knowledge and Belief

Are there no good people?

True Opinion vs. Knowledge

  1. Distinction

  2. Value?

Final Diagnosis

The Virtuous

This would include Pericles, Thucydides...

Virtue is found to be neither natural nor taught, but is imported to us by a divine dispensation without understanding in those who receive it... If there should be [a person with understanding] he might fairly be said to be among the living what Homer says Teiresias was among the dead...

a real substance among shadows.

What's the argument?

Conclusion:

Virtue is found to be neither natural nor taught, but is imported to us by a divine dispensation without understanding in those who receive it